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They hold their Bible in front of them like a silver tray: the word of Jehovah. There are passages explaining why nicotine is forbidden but a glass of wine at the end of the day permitted, why blood transfusions are to be avoided and why non-believers must be converted. They don't mention that the Protestant church has described the translation of the Bible used by Jehovah's Witnesses as inaccurate and uncritical.

Throughout the meeting, Bible passages are discussed at length and hymns are sung.

Like a faith-based dating manual, it includes tips on how to "get to know" the other person.

1) "Discuss something from the Bible together" 2) "Observe how the other person participates in meetings and sermons" 3) "Help clean the Kingdom Hall (a place of worship used by Jehova's witnesses) and with construction projects" How many German youths would rather sweep the floors of the Kingdom Hall than spend their summer days flirting at the swimming pool?

No Masturbation, No Homosexuals Like many young Jehovah's Witnesses, Melanie has read a glossy pamphlet entitled "Questions Young People Ask: Answers That Work." It makes it clear that homosexuality is forbidden and masturbation demonized.

The pamphlet, Melanie says, contains a lot of information on topics she is familiar with: what it's like to feel like an outsider at school, or to have false desires "for sex or self-gratification." The pamphlet also includes a chapter on how a young Jehovah's Witness can determine if a potential partner is right for him or her.

They sit close together, still and pious in the seats usually occupied by cheering, swearing fans of the Borussia Dortmund football club.Having doubts about his faith, the oldest son stayed home.It's a blow to the parents but the enthusiasm of their younger children compensates for the one son's lack of faith. family has traveled to Germany's Ruhr region for what many Jehovah's Witnesses consider the high point of the year.They arrive in caravans, bringing Tupperware, coolers, blankets and, most importantly, their Bibles.Here they can pray among peers, feeling a sense of community instead of isolation.

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